Culture, Listings, Screen

Cinema inspired by heat

The Instituto Cervantes is offering a series of Spanish films where high temperature features as the main character.


In summer, heat plays a leading role in Spanish life. At times, the rising level of the thermometer can change a person’s lifestyle, when the heat is all you can think about.

This has served as an inspiration to some Spanish directors, who have captured in their films the transformation of Spanish day-to-day life during the summer period with the holidays and the huge influx of tourism.

Organised by the Instituto Cervantes in London, throughout the month of August the film series “Escuela de Calor” (School of Heat) will review some of the films and short films that portray this reality.

The first in this series will be “Summer Clouds” (2004) directed by Felipe Vega. This film tells the story of a couple, Ana and Daniel, and their son who have gone to spend their holidays in a tourist resort on the Costa Brava in Spain.

There they meet Marta, Tomas and Robert, young workers in the town, with whom they become embroiled in a web of love, lies and truth.

The following film will be “Pic Nic” (2008), in which the director Eloy Enciso produces a critique of what we call a period of rest and relaxation, setting the camera on a Mediterranean beach in August.

There, he presents a collection of daily scenes that form a reflection on the contemporary man.

Along with those are the short films “Las horas muertas” (Dead hours) by Haritz Zubiliaga, “Mala espina” (Unease) by Belén Macías, “La autoridad” (The authority) by Xavi Sala, “Exlibris” by María Trénor, “Tres en la playa” (Three on the beach) by Santiago Candel and “Verano o los defectos de Andrés” (Summer or the defects of Andrés) by Jorge Torregrossa.

All films will be screened on the first three Fridays in August at 5pm in the auditorium at the Instituto Cervantes, 102 Eaton Square, SW1W 9AN.

For more information visit: http://londres.cervantes.es/en/default.shtm

(Translated by Rory Mulloy)

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