Globe, Latin America, Multiculture, Our People

Answers to female vulnerability

On the 12th December a London Congress will analyse the influence between political and social instability in regions with high levels of gender-related violence.


According to a report published by the World Health Organisation (WHO), between 15% and 70% of women in the world have been victims of physical and sexual violence inflicted by a partner.

The research based on the testimony of women from different countries, most of them developed countries, reflects the scale of a social problem that in the 21st century continues to be a reality. The United Nations warns that the maltreatment of women is a risk for public health and a violation of human rights.

Currently, there are numerous initiatives running that are trying to halt the increase in cases of physical, sexual or psychological violence that many people are having inflicted upon them because of their gender.

However, negative figures are even higher in countries experiencing armed conflict. As the UN warns, it is in “situations of conflict and displacement that violence can be exacerbated”.

As a result of this, the UN Trustee Fund will next year invest over 8 million US dollars to cover 12 local initiatives in 18 countries. The aim will be to improve the life of victims living in countries “undergoing conflict, post-conflict or in transition”, some of them in Latin America.

A congress will take place in London on the 12th December that will discuss this topic and possible solutions. The Institute of the Americas will discuss the difficult situation that women and girls are experiencing in Peru and Colombia, among other countries.

Among the participants at the debate will be the Colombian Linda Cabrera, from SismaMujeres/ABColombia, who alongside other speakers, will debate and analyse the different international actions, both political and judicial, needed to alleviate this global nastiness.

UN WOMEN confirm that at present “7 out of 10 women are victims of physical and/or sexual violence, and 603 million women live in countries where violence is still not considered a crime”.

All of these cooperation schemes that are underway thanks to the United Nations rely on support and collaboration from the United Kingdom.

For more information go to: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/americas/ia-events/violence_women

(Translated by Claire Donneky – Email: claire.donneky@ukgateway.net)

Answers to female vulnerability

On the 12th December a London Congress will analyse the influence between political and social instability in regions with high levels of gender-related violence.

According to a report published by the World Health Organisation (WHO), between 15% and 70% of women in the world have been victims of physical and sexual violence inflicted by a partner.

The research based on the testimony of women from different countries, most of them developed countries, reflects the scale of a social problem that in the 21st century continues to be a reality. The United Nations warns that the maltreatment of women is a risk for public health and a violation of human rights.

Currently, there are numerous initiatives running that are trying to halt the increase in cases of physical, sexual or psychological violence that many people are having inflicted upon them because of their gender.

However, negative figures are even higher in countries experiencing armed conflict. As the UN warns, it is in “situations of conflict and displacement that violence can be exacerbated”.

As a result of this, the UN Trustee Fund will next year invest over 8 million US dollars to cover 12 local initiatives in 18 countries. The aim will be to improve the life of victims living in countries “undergoing conflict, post-conflict or in transition”, some of them in Latin America.

A congress will take place in London on the 12th December that will discuss this topic and possible solutions. The Institute of the Americas will discuss the difficult situation that women and girls are experiencing in Peru and Colombia, among other countries.

Among the participants at the debate will be the Colombian Linda Cabrera, from SismaMujeres/ABColombia, who alongside other speakers, will debate and analyse the different international actions, both political and judicial, needed to alleviate this global nastiness.

UN WOMEN confirm that at present “7 out of 10 women are victims of physical and/or sexual violence, and 603 million women live in countries where violence is still not considered a crime”.

All of these cooperation schemes that are underway thanks to the United Nations rely on support and collaboration from the United Kingdom.

For more information go to: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/americas/ia-events/violence_women

(Translated by Claire Donneky – Email: claire.donneky@ukgateway.net)

Answers to female vulnerability

On the 12th December a London Congress will analyse the influence between political and social instability in regions with high levels of gender-related violence.

According to a report published by the World Health Organisation (WHO), between 15% and 70% of women in the world have been victims of physical and sexual violence inflicted by a partner.

The research based on the testimony of women from different countries, most of them developed countries, reflects the scale of a social problem that in the 21st century continues to be a reality. The United Nations warns that the maltreatment of women is a risk for public health and a violation of human rights.

Currently, there are numerous initiatives running that are trying to halt the increase in cases of physical, sexual or psychological violence that many people are having inflicted upon them because of their gender.

However, negative figures are even higher in countries experiencing armed conflict. As the UN warns, it is in “situations of conflict and displacement that violence can be exacerbated”.

As a result of this, the UN Trustee Fund will next year invest over 8 million US dollars to cover 12 local initiatives in 18 countries. The aim will be to improve the life of victims living in countries “undergoing conflict, post-conflict or in transition”, some of them in Latin America.

A congress will take place in London on the 12th December that will discuss this topic and possible solutions. The Institute of the Americas will discuss the difficult situation that women and girls are experiencing in Peru and Colombia, among other countries.

Among the participants at the debate will be the Colombian Linda Cabrera, from SismaMujeres/ABColombia, who alongside other speakers, will debate and analyse the different international actions, both political and judicial, needed to alleviate this global nastiness.

UN WOMEN confirm that at present “7 out of 10 women are victims of physical and/or sexual violence, and 603 million women live in countries where violence is still not considered a crime”.

All of these cooperation schemes that are underway thanks to the United Nations rely on support and collaboration from the United Kingdom.

For more information go to: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/americas/ia-events/violence_women

(Translated by Claire Donneky – Email: claire.donneky@ukgateway.net)

Answers to female vulnerability

On the 12th December a London Congress will analyse the influence between political and social instability in regions with high levels of gender-related violence.

According to a report published by the World Health Organisation (WHO), between 15% and 70% of women in the world have been victims of physical and sexual violence inflicted by a partner.

The research based on the testimony of women from different countries, most of them developed countries, reflects the scale of a social problem that in the 21st century continues to be a reality. The United Nations warns that the maltreatment of women is a risk for public health and a violation of human rights.

Currently, there are numerous initiatives running that are trying to halt the increase in cases of physical, sexual or psychological violence that many people are having inflicted upon them because of their gender.

However, negative figures are even higher in countries experiencing armed conflict. As the UN warns, it is in “situations of conflict and displacement that violence can be exacerbated”.

As a result of this, the UN Trustee Fund will next year invest over 8 million US dollars to cover 12 local initiatives in 18 countries. The aim will be to improve the life of victims living in countries “undergoing conflict, post-conflict or in transition”, some of them in Latin America.

A congress will take place in London on the 12th December that will discuss this topic and possible solutions. The Institute of the Americas will discuss the difficult situation that women and girls are experiencing in Peru and Colombia, among other countries.

Among the participants at the debate will be the Colombian Linda Cabrera, from SismaMujeres/ABColombia, who alongside other speakers, will debate and analyse the different international actions, both political and judicial, needed to alleviate this global nastiness.

UN WOMEN confirm that at present “7 out of 10 women are victims of physical and/or sexual violence, and 603 million women live in countries where violence is still not considered a crime”.

All of these cooperation schemes that are underway thanks to the United Nations rely on support and collaboration from the United Kingdom.

For more information go to: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/americas/ia-events/violence_women

(Translated by Claire Donneky – Email: claire.donneky@ukgateway.net)

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