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Carpe Diem

The media that are open to influence, in bed with big business and its spokespeople and shielded by a supposed and false freedom of the press at the service of the powerful, say that “Professor Robin Keating” killed himself because of drugs, alcohol, economic losses and other similar trivialities.

 

Carpe Diem 7Armando Orozco Tovar

 

We are surrounded by death, something that sounds like stating the obvious, a great truth. But what are we going to do about it?

I felt a deathly sensation- as rarely before- upon hearing the news of the suicide by hanging of Robin Williams, who was the lead actor in the 1992 film “Dead Poets Society” which changed us in some way as teachers.

I remember that I invited my students to watch the film, and we were all left with a desire to be poets (even though we had already attempted it), to meet in a secret society to read and study the giants of lyrical poetry, to be one of them.

Debates were held on the content of the film in order to understand it. What Robin Williams tried to convey with his masterful performance as Professor John Keating left a great impression.

This was because someone had to appear in that North American school where the plot develops, breaking the retrogressive moulds imposed within it; in the same way the page of a traditional text that teaches nothing new is ripped out.

And even more so regarding poetry as creation; its essence from the times of early ancient Greece.

So, seeing Robin Williams in that role, many of us felt touched and even stood on our classroom chairs, saying out loud: “let´s be ourselves and put aside the many false conceptions, prejudices and absurdities instilled through the religious education imposed in this country over the course of its history, since the moment when all the wars were lost, those that enabled other visions closely related to modernity”.

Education was solely based on the slogan “spare the rod, and spoil the child”, and not something that constructed creativity and discovered a new human being. John Keating arrived, hounded by his sombre, selfish and twisted colleagues and superiors on the teaching staff at the school, where he would give classes on literature and poetry.

From the very beginning his revolutionary methods and concepts came under fire to the point of his being forced out, to the amazement and sorrow of his students.

They would never again receive his enlightenment, which had freed them from the shadows of that conservative, backward and moralistic education.

In both that and this society, such education leads to the most abnormal corruption, genocide and contempt for nature in all its potential forms, in order to make the economic progress of a minority possible.

We saw ourselves reflected in Peter Weir´s film, which showed that if you want poetry to be loved, you have to be more and more alive each day than the day before…let´s say constantly alive, but aware of what we have around us that is within our reach and we can feel.

Carpe Diem, the Latin motto uttered by the recently-arrived professor that opens the film, must also have been the slogan of a people such as this, badly educated in the mystical, divine “after”, that will only find their nonexistent paradise in the “there and yonder” of death.

The media that are open to influence, in bed with big business and its spokespeople and shielded by a supposed and false freedom of the press at the service of the powerful, say that “Professor Robin Keating” killed himself because of drugs, alcohol, economic losses and other similar trivialities.

We don´t believe a word of it. Rather, isn´t it that others did it for him, like they have already tried out on others of a similar or equal status?

Robin Williams was an exceptional being who had the ability to speak to animals and be understood by them, as he did with Koko, the enormous trained African gorilla that he laughed with, tickled and held in his arms.

The proof was recorded in a video that anyone can find. They say that the wild, loving animal was saddened by the news of his death.

Carpe Diemis an expression of Latin origin, of the Roman poet Horacio. Its literal translation gives relevance to the phrase “seize the day”, whose intention is to encourage the good use of time so as not to waste a second.

 (Translated by Alfie Lake) – Photos: Pixabay

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